Property Line

Property lines are an opinion of title based on a preponderance of evidence.  No measurement is perfect and no opinion of property line is perfect.  This does not sound like one could rely upon a property line.  Usually, Surveyors will have similar opinions on where the property lines are within a di minimus position.  Still, the standard certification is based on the plan of record and the monuments used to fix that plan.

Generally, surveys are not performed extensively enough.  When surveying one subdivision, it is rare to survey to the other side of an adjacent subdivision.  The monuments on the common lines are held and things work out just fine until someone looks at the entirety of two subdivisions.  Due to the older measurements not being as precise and older mathematical limitations, we are finding more gaps and overlaps along subdivision lines.  The resolution of these flaws in the record are sometimes a trivial endeavor, though they all require research to ascertain the intention of some or all of the previous grantors of the property.

We are doing our best to remedy all of the boundaries to the best of our abilities.  Our method is piecemeal as we are compiling our traverse data into larger solutions that include the surveys from nearby properties.  We will use what we have until we have more.

One interesting concept that affects the surveys up through the 1990s is the adjustment of steel tapes.  When used correctly, steel tapes used with the necessary adjustments can produce some very accurate and precise results.  Unfortunately this requires the application of adjustments based on tension, temperature, angle and so on.  It has been observed that many of the surveys based on steel tape can be scaled to better match the original monuments.  We are reluctant to do so until all of the record monuments are located.

Scaling a plan does not always result in a perceptible difference in a boundary line.  Recently, we adjusted George Ryder Road which had about 0.5' of error in 5,000 feet of route.  The difference for a 100' line is 0.01'.  The distance from the starting point of the road to that 100' line is what changed by up to 0.5'.  Had we not adjusted the road, the error would have likely been placed between the record math and the monuments.

There is a hierarchy of the boundary provided:

Level 0.  GIS Parcel Layer.  This is an excellent starting point but should not be used for anything other than a picture.

Level 1. Record plans approximately translated to the State Plane Coordinate System.

Level 2. Record plans fully translated to the State Plane Coordinate System.

Level 3. Record plans adjusted to the monumentation and fully translated to the State Plane Coordinate System.

Level 4. Gaps and overlaps between separate plans are remedied.  All plans involved are translated to the State Plane Coordinate System.

 

Site Plan - Topographic

Level 0 - Aerial topographical data produce by Chas. H. Sells from photography acquired in the spring of 2000.  2' contour interval meeting the National Map Accuracy Standards.

Level 1 - Aerial topographical data extracted from the 2011 'LFTNE' USGS aerial LiDAR dataset or the 2013 'Post-Sandy' USGS aerial LiDAR dataset.  1' contour interval meeting the National Map Accuracy Standards.

Level 2 - Drone topographical data.  While this is often superior to the Level 0 and Level 1 topographic information, it is often limited by area, date of acquisition and hidden features.

Level 3 - Surveyed topography.  While this is often superior to the Level 0 and Level 1 topographic information, it is often limited by area, date of acquisition and hidden features.

Level 4 - Terrestrial LiDAR.  While this is often superior to the Level 0 and Level 1 topographic information, it is often limited by area, date of acquisition and hidden features.

 

Site Plan - Planimetric

Level 0 - Aerial planimetric data produce by Chas. H. Sells from photography acquired in the spring of 2000.  1" = 40' scale meeting the National Map Accuracy Standards.

Level 1 - Aerial planimetric data extracted from the 2011 'LFTNE' USGS aerial LiDAR dataset or the 2013 'Post-Sandy' USGS aerial LiDAR dataset combined with the 2014 USGS aerial imagery or more recent.  1" = 40' scale meeting the National Map Accuracy Standards.

Level 2 - Drone planimetric data.  The accuracy of this data varies per survey but generally exceeds 1" = 40' scale meeting the National Map Accuracy Standards.

Level 3 - Surveyed planimetric data.

Level 4 - Terrestrial LiDAR. 

 

Site Plan - Utilities

Level 0 - Utilities based on GIS Maps or digitizing from site plans prepared by others.  The quality of these locations is variable.

Level 1 - Utilities based on locations of Dig Safe markings.  The quality of these locations is variable.

Level 2 - Utilities based on locations of in house markings.  The quality of these locations is variable.

 

Certification and Seal

The level of the survey is described on the face of the Site Plan.  However, 250 CMR mandates certain client information be included on the Site Plan before it can be sealed.

The purpose of these plans is to provide the basics one needs for planning and preliminary design before formally engaging the services of East-SouthEast, LLC.  Due to the volume of requests, we have not been able to provide the first part of the survey as needed by the designers, architects and engineers in a timely manner.  As we now have equipment that is most effective on the larger scale, it is feasible to survey an entire neighborhood rather than a lot at a time.  This leads us to the solution of producing generic Site Plans that will allow the design to progress immediately.  We recommend that you contact our office earlier in the process to wait in the queue while you are working with the designer, architect or engineer.